March 9, 2006

Suffolk Roman coin hoard

A hoard of Roman coins unearthed in a Suffolk field is the largest discovery of its kind ever made in Britain, an inquest heard yesterday. . .

John Newman, from Suffolk County Council's Archaeological Service, told the treasure inquest in Bury St Edmunds that the coins, which were originally adorned with a silver wash, were minted during the reign of the so-called usurper emperor Carausius (287-293 AD), who set himself up in opposition to Rome, and his successor Allectus (293-296 AD).

"This appears to be the largest hoard of legitimately minted coins of the two usurpers from Britain to date," he said. "The coins are made up of 258 of Carausius and 347 of Allectus, minted at London and possibly Southampton or Colchester, which was the first time official mints were set up in Roman Britain."

Read the rest here.

Posted by David on March 9, 2006 4:49 PM

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